7 Reasons Why Dog Obesity is Dangerous

7 Reasons Why Dog Obesity is Dangerous

The truth is, most pet parents take dog obesity so very lightly. While it is true that obese dogs look cuter, funnier and cuddlier, obesity is one of the top health threats for our fur-babies.

"One simple and easy way to determine if your fur-baby is obese is through touch and appearance. To do so, try pressing your fur-baby's sides. As you do this, you should be able to feel his ribs."

As technology and science continues to evolve, our pets now have higher chances of living longer compared to before, so many pet parents think dog obesity isn't such a big deal. More illnesses and diseases have become treatable (and can be prevented) and a lot of pet products are available to help our pets live happier and hassle-free lives. But there's a downside to that because once your dog develops the bad effects of obesity, it can become a life-long dilemma.

Here, we've come up with the negative impacts dog obesity can cause you and ways to help your dog to either stay away or recover from it.

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY DOG IS OBESE?

Dog

The dog obesity weight differs from one dog to another as they are all different and many factors are considered, too, like current health condition, age, sex, breed, etc.

One simple and easy way to determine if your fur-baby is obese is through touch and appearance. To do so, try pressing your fur-baby's sides. As you do this, you should be able to feel his ribs. If you are having a hard time feeling them or don't feel them at all, then yes, your fur-baby is obese. You can also consult your vet to know if your dog is just plain fat or is already obese.

If he is, then don't stress yourself out too much because of course, you can always do something about it (but fast!) before it worsens and puts your dog's health at risk.

DANGERS OF DOG OBESITY

The following are the negative things your dog can go through if his obesity is not given attention immediately.

Arthritis. Extra weight put on a lot of pressure on your fur-baby's joints. Because of this, the joints' cartilage deteriorates and then eventually develops arthritis. Yeah, yeah there are many pain medications available. There sure a lot but do you really want to see your fur-baby not able to enjoy the things he used to, like running, jumping, swimming, and playing fetch because he can't move properly?

Compromised Immune System. Not only does dog obesity affect your fur-baby's joints but it also damages the immune system.

Dogs that are obese have immune systems that don't really function well and that makes them more prone to different kinds of illnesses and may not recover as fast as fit dogs do.

Heart diseases and breathing difficulties. Too much weight not only increases high blood pressure in your fur-baby but can also trigger heart diseases and breathing difficulties.Obese dogs are more susceptible to developing trachea damages and respiratory crises that can be life-threatening if not addressed properly.

Tumors and cancer risks. The extra fats on your dog can increase the risks or develop into tumors as benign fatty tumors, bladder cancer, and breast cancer.

Surgery dangers. Surgeries our dogs go through like spaying, neutering, operations and giving birth via C-section requires the use of anesthesia. When on anesthesia, breathing becomes a struggle since chest expansion is difficult during these times.

Skin diseases. Obesity means you'll have to deal with all those extra skin folds. These extra skin folds are itchy. Your fur-baby will keep on scratching it and will eventually be inflamed or wounded and can develop into an infection.

Decreased quantity and quality of life. Obesity can take away two years of your fur-baby's life! Quality is also affected since obesity hinders him from doing so many things, without being tired immediately. Carrying a lot of extra pounds comes with a lot of downsides, eh?

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO FIGHT OFF DOG OBESITY

Many pet parents think that having their fur-babies gain a few more extra pounds is okay, but again, it is not, as it can cause major (and even lifetime) health problems in their pets.

To prevent or recover from obesity, here are the top things you can do:

Consult your vet. Your vet knows best how much weight your dog should maintain or should lose to avoid dog obesity. Go in for regular checkups to keep track of your dog's weight. Your vet will also prescribe diet and lifestyle plans for your fur-baby.

Provide a high-quality diet, served in proper portions. Diet contributes greatly to dog obesity that's why you should make sure to give only your fur-baby scheduled meal times and with a controlled, high-quality diet with lesser calories.

Stay active and exercise. Exercise is very important in keeping your dog fit and healthy. It's not okay that your dog eats too much and does not get enough exercise.

  • Walking allows the two of you to bond while getting some fresh air.
  • Swimming can build muscles and burn calories without hurting your fur-baby's joints.
  • Playing fetch is great and will raise fitness levels in your fur-baby.

Give Pet Parents® Joint Supplements for dogs. This will provide your fur-baby with healthy ingredients that help support dog joint health and help promote mobility support. It specifically has Glucosamine for dogs, a compound that may help create a cushion & promote lubrication around joints to help support comfortable movement & flexibility.

Also, you can consider Pet Parents® Turmeric for Dogs Supplement that will provide your fur-baby with healthy ingredients that can help promote dog immune support & dog joint health.

It has natural turmeric & curcumin that help maintain healthy bone & joint function.

Dog obesity is a health threat to our fur-babies and to help our fur-babies stay away from it, it is our major responsibility to lead them into a lifestyle that's healthier and happier.

"Your vet knows best how much weight your dog should maintain or should lose to avoid dog obesity. Go in for regular checkups to keep track of your dog's weight."

The Author:

Micka V.

Micka Virtudazo is a full-time content creator at Pet Parents who lives with thirteen adorable American Bullies and a Shih Tzu-Maltese mix named Gretel. She especially enjoys writing how-to articles as she feels through this she can connect to other pet parents on a more personal level.

Read More

Click on the icons below to learn more about

specific products for pet health & supplements