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Potty Training Your Puppy With a Full-Time Gig

Imagine having to give time and focus on two different things that require you to be all-in and committed. Potty training your puppy while having a full-time job can be difficult. But with careful planning, practical scheduling, trustworthy friends, and sometimes paid help, it can be done.

Here, we’ll give you tips and tricks on how to potty train your puppy even while working full-time. So both you and your pup can cope just fine!

potty training your puppy

"It is okay to leave your pup alone. Being in their company all the time can turn them into an overly people-dependent dog and can increase the chances of them having separation anxiety."

Leaving your pup alone is okay

Having a full-time gig can mean two things: 1) You will be leaving your puppy alone or; 2) If working from home is your new normal, then your pup will probably be all by themselves somewhere in the house or in their confinement areas. 

As a pet parent, it is inevitable for you to feel guilty (your pup’s adorable puppy eyes can be a factor for this, too!). But as a matter of fact, it is okay to leave your pup alone. Being in their company all the time can turn them into an overly people-dependent dog and can increase the chances of them having separation anxiety. 

Leaving your pup alone will make them learn the skill of being independent and that is what you’ll need. But how long can you leave them alone? Puppies, unlike adult dogs, can’t hold their bladder and bowels for a long time. To know the maximum time, take your pup’s age and add one. For example, if your pup is four months old, then your pup will be able to hold potty for five hours, and so on. Leaving your pup alone for longer hours is unhealthy and will lead to even more accidents...  

Place your puppy in a confinement area or in a crate and place pee pads for dogs as a lining, in case your puppy creates accidents. Make sure the pee pads for dogs you use are like Pet Parents® Pawtect™ Washable Pads. These are premium dog pee pads packs in the fluids, have triple-stitched binding, and made from proprietary fabric blend to successfully prevent a mess. 

And as Pet Central notes, a properly sized crate is an important training tool, both for potty training and keeping your dog safe when you’re not around to supervise. The crate provides your puppy with a comfortable space that taps into a dog’s natural denning instinct. 

So what do you do now? 

Ask for help

Your pup will need frequent potty breaks at least every few hours. You will need somebody to take them outside to encourage potty training for your puppy. This will require some scheduling and planning. If it’s impossible for you to go home or take your pup out during your breaks (if working from home), then this is where you will need the help of your family members, trustworthy friends, friendly neighbors, or some paid help from trusted puppy sitters or doggie daycares.

It is recommended that the same person takes your pup outside for potty training so they don’t get themselves confused and are constantly adjusting. Also, keep potty breaks on a fixed schedule every time - even on your days off, when you’ll be the one to take your pup outside for potty training.

Keep your pup happy before going to work

While raising a pup while having full-time work can be hard, keeping your pup happy before going to work isn’t. You can:

  • Take your pup for a brief walk or play with your pup before going to work. This will leave your pup happily tired.
  • Leave your puppy toys and chews to choose from to occupy them in between outside potty training. Just make sure that you leave your puppy with toys and chews that are proven to be safe and healthy, like Gnawtlers®. These are premium antler chews that make a delicious treat. These chews strengthen your pup’s teeth and health without all the calories and digestive & safety issues associated with other options like processed treats.

Other things to consider

Manage your expectations. Your puppy will not learn outdoor potty training overnight. It is a process so be patient. Some pups learn faster, some pick-up much longer. And that is totally okay!

Aim for success. If your pup does not perform when taken outside, wait for a few minutes and don’t give up just yet! Puppies are puppies and taking them outside can mean so much to them: a walk to the park, playtime, a visit to the vet, and a lot more. This is why you shouldn’t leave them alone as they can be easily distracted. Stay with them until they do their thing.

Give rewards. After your pup does their thing, don’t forget to reward them. This way, he will be able to associate that peeing and pooping outdoors can gain him some treats and praises. This can also be called positive reinforcement in dogs. 

Positive reinforcement in dogs is the process of using positive techniques and rewards when your fur-baby does something good. Your dog will then be able to realize that if they do certain things, then they will be given rewards! Yay! 

As you reinforce your fur-baby’s praiseworthy behaviors and actions, there is decrease in the chances that your dog will be involved in doing things or exhibiting the naughty behaviors you don’t like. 

Do not give punishments. Ever. Punishing a puppy because they had an accident in inappropriate places will only scare your pup. This will make outdoor potty training harder for them. Your pup will also try to hide from you whenever they feel like going to the potty. According to PupBoxscolding and punishing your puppy is never fun, for you or for them. It leads to hurt feelings, anxiety, and lack of trust. This can be the absolute worst when it comes to your furry best friend, just because of a little bad behavior.

Now, who said potty training your puppy with a full-time gig is impossible?

potty training your puppy

"Gnawtlers® are premium antler chews that make a delicious treat. These chews strengthen your pup’s teeth and health without all the calories and digestive & safety issues associated with other options like processed treats."

The Author:

Micka V.

Micka Virtudazo is a full-time content creator at Pet Parents who lives with thirteen adorable American Bullies and a Shih Tzu-Maltese mix named Gretel. She especially enjoys writing how-to articles as she feels through this she can connect to other pet parents on a more personal level.

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