Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs

Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs

The Author:

Micka V.

Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs is a uterine disorder that usually develops in female dogs that are intact.

"Pyometra happens when a bacteria infects the abnormally thickened lining of the uterus and the pus either stays inside the uterus (close pyometra) or drains out of the dog's vulva (open pyometra)."

Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia is the abnormal thickening in the lining of a dog's uterus and is identified by the presence of sacs or cysts that are fluid-filled.

Pyometra in dogs, on the other hand, is secondary to Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia. Pyometra happens when a bacteria infects the abnormally thickened lining of the uterus and the pus either stays inside the uterus (close pyometra) or drains out of the dog's vulva (open pyometra).

Recognizing pyometra symptoms in dogs can be confusing since the clinical signs are mostly nonspecific and can definitely differ depending on the severeness of the disease. But here, we've gathered possible signs for early recognition, treatment and things necessary to do for a successful recovery.

SIGNS AND CHANGES OBSERVED

Clinical signs are mostly nonspecific and can definitely vary (as mentioned above) but the following can indicate that there is something wrong with your dog and you need to contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

  • Constant discharge from the vulva which usually comes with blood, mucus and pus
  • Depression
  • Lack or loss of appetite
  • Increased urination
  • Vomiting
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Abdominal distension
  • Uterus is enlarged if there is closed pyometra (because pus is not drained)

POSSIBLE CAUSES OF PYOMETRA AND CYSTIC ENDOMETRIAL HYPERPLASIA IN DOGS

Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs can be caused by a few different factors. It can be by the constant exposure of the endometrium (lining of the uterus) to estrogen and then preceded by progesterone during heat. It can also be caused by hormonal imbalance in female dogs.

HOW IS THIS DIAGNOSED AND TREATED?

Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs is diagnosed when there is a high level of the white blood cell count of the dog and often has a high level of globulins (a type of protein produced by the immune system) in the blood. Your veterinarian may also suggest to have your dog undergo an ultrasound or an X-ray to check the condition of the uterus and the severeness of the illness.

The treatment most preferred is to completely remove the uterus and the ovaries of the female dog, also called as spaying. Some also prefer the draining or constant flushing of the pus 'stuck' in the uterus (if the pyometra is closed and cannot drain); antibiotics are then administered.

FOLLOW-UP CARE AND MANAGEMENT

Diapers. Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs is very dangerous and must be treated immediately. But since treatment will depend on the health condition and symptoms of your dog, it is best to use dog diapers for the mean time if pus is coming out. These can also be used for incision site management and wound cover up and will be a handy post-surgery must-have since your dog will have no full control of his or her bladder and/or bowel for a couple of hours to days and may pee or poop anytime and anywhere. These dog diapers will help keep dogs from bathing in their own 'mess.'

Pet Parents® diapers come in a variety of colors as well as sizes, so you’re sure to get the proper fit for your furry buddy. If treatment is not performed, the toxic effects from the bacteria of the infection will be life-threatening. Sense of urgency is needed here.

Provide proper nutrition. Providing your dog a good, healthy diet is a perfect way to boost up his wellness. But make sure that this diet is advised by your veterinarian so it will provide her with the proper nutrition she needs.

Take a walk. Walks and exercises are very vital in keeping up your dog's balance, joints flexibility, and good blood circulation.

Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs won’t heal alone. If pus is coming out of your dog, it will eventually stop but then will reoccur in the following weeks or months ahead. The toxic effects from the bacteria will spread throughout different organs and will be dangerous for your dog - that’s why immediate treatment is really needed.

"Pyometra and Cystic Endometrial Hyperplasia in Dogs is diagnosed when there is a high level of the white blood cell count of the dog and often has a high level of globulins (a type of protein produced by the immune system) in the blood."

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